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Lincoln Park

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Everything Lincoln Park- Site with Information and News about Lincoln Park

Homebuyers considering downtown Chicago condos are often wooed by Lincoln Park real estate because of its charming mix of urban high-rises and suburban feeling single-family homes. Nestled between the neighborhoods of Lakeview to the north, Bucktown to the west, and Near North to the south, this popular area of Chicago real estate offers a variety of attractions and a convenient location.

Whether you prefer condo living or quaint, tree-lined brownstone and graystone homes or something in between, Lincoln Park is sure to have what you are looking for. Those who prefer the convenience and sweeping views of a high-rise building will soon have the option to choose from one of the 314 Lincoln Park condos and 13 townhomes under construction in the Lincoln Park 2520, located at 2520 N. Lakeview Ave. The modern units designed by Lucien Lagrange will range from the mid $500’s to an estimated $9 million for the luxury penthouse.

Many of the Lincoln Park homes have been converted into multi-unit condominiums and apartments to serve the many DePaul students and young professionals drawn to the neighborhood. However, many of those single-family homes are being reverted back to their original state, as Lincoln Park is becoming an increasingly popular site to raise a family. The almost suburban feel of the long neighborhood streets and the proximity to Lincoln Park, the Lincoln Park Zoo, and Lake Michigan makes Lincoln Park real estate an ideal choice for active families.

For those who enjoy the outdoors, Lincoln Park, for which the area is named, sits on 1,200 acres of endless bike and jogging paths, baseball diamonds, soccer fields, picnic areas, a public golf course, and the famous Lincoln Park Zoo. In addition, Lake Michigan provides a recreational outlet for beachgoers and water enthusiasts alike. The annual summer Sheffield Garden Walk & Festival welcomes people from throughout Chicago to over 100 gardens in the area, and the annual Chicago Air & Water Show draws crowds from all over the Midwest.

The neighborhood of Lincoln Park began when the City of Chicago transformed the large cemetery near Lake Michigan into a publicly supported park in 1864. City funding in the 1970’s helped transform Lincoln Park into the elegant, bustling, city within a city that is now home to nearly 65,000 Chicagoans. Boasting nearly 300 restaurants within its three square miles, Lincoln Park enjoys an eclectic choice of restaurants, bars, lounges, and clubs. Lincoln Avenue between Diversey and Armitage has an impressive concentration of eateries and watering holes and is host to the Taste of Lincoln Avenue each July. Lincoln Parkers will find additional outdoor entertainment at the Lincoln Park Summerfest, in the park itself; the Lincoln Park Fall Festival on Southport Avenue; and the Oktoberfest Pumpkin & Beer Festival in late September.

The Lincoln Park neighborhood also has a vibrant cultural component. It features nearly twenty galleries and is home to three museums: The Chicago History Museum, The DePaul University Art Museum, and the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum. The Steppenwolf Theater Company, the Victory Garden Greenhouse Theater, and Second City offer a myriad of performances throughout the week. The Lincoln Park Art Fair each September turns the streets into mobile galleries for local and international artists.

Lincoln Park has two public elementary (K-8) schools, Abraham Lincoln Elementary and Oscar Mayer Elementary. Lincoln Park High School is the public secondary school in the neighborhood and is one of the top ranked schools in Chicago. The Saint Clement School (K-8) and the Francis W. Parker School (K-12), provide private school alternatives.

Easily accessible by Chicago mass transit, Lincoln Park has CTA Red, Brown, and Purple line stops at Fullerton. The Purple and Brown lines also stop at Armitage and Diversey. CTA buses run throughout the neighborhood and are a popular mode of transportation.